Archive for Pottsville chiropractor

Why skin numbness or tingling should not be ignored

If you have persistent numbness or tingling in your arms or legs, even if it’s slight, you should immediately seek advice from your health professional.

Numbness or tingling in the arms and legs indicates an interruption to proper nerve function. If you feel temporary numbness or tingling after sitting or standing in one position for too long, that is just due to a temporarily pinched nerve and will rectify itself. However, ongoing numbness or tingling signals continual pressure on the nerve that can cause lasting damage, or indicate the presence of disease. 

The most common causes of persistent numbness or tingling are:

  • a partial dislocation of a joint or organ, known as subluxation
  • a bulge or herniation of the rubbery discs that sit between vertebrae on your spine
  • diabetes
  • multiple sclerosis
  • stroke
  • systemic disorders such as kidney disorders or hormonal imbalances, including hypothyroidism
  • autoimmune diseases such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis
  • Raynaud’s phenomenon
  • vitamin B12 deficiency
  • chemotherapy.

How numbness and tingling can be treated

Most cases of ongoing numbness or tingling can be treated by a chiropractor, who can restore alignment, improve mobility, relieve nerve pressure, and reduce inflammation in the body.

In addition to chiropractic manipulation, your chiropractor may treat the numbness and tingling through methods such as ice packs, massage, traction, stretching and strengthening.  If the chiropractor identifies that the numbness and tingling is caused by a serious medical issue such as diabetes, stroke or multiple sclerosis, they will refer you for medical reviews. 

Some methods for reducing numbness and tingling include eating a healthy, balanced diet, avoiding toxins such as cigarettes and alcohol, and following an exercise program recommended by your doctor.

To find out more about how to treat numbness and tingling sensations in your body contact Bruce at Lane Chiropractic Pottsville on 6676 2270.

Five ways to ease muscle pain

It’s not uncommon to get muscle pain up to 48 hours after exercise. Even if you haven’t been to the gym or completed a triathlon, you can get muscle pain from working in the garden, or doing strenuous household chores.

The good news is that normal muscle soreness is a sign that your body is getting stronger. Muscle pain is often associated with something called delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), which occurs when your workout has created tiny tears in muscle fibres.  The pain occurs as the fibres repair and become even stronger. A burning sensation in the muscles is due to a build-up of lactic acid that often occurs immediately after intense exercise, but this tends to resolve itself fairly quickly.

Muscle soreness often goes away by itself within a few days. However, while the muscles are healing, it can be uncomfortable and restrict movement. Try these quick tips to ease your muscle pain.

  1. Rest

As your body recovers, it needs time to heal.  If you can, take some time out and rest the muscles to give them a chance to heal faster. 

2. Do gentle exercise

Even when resting muscles, it’s still important to keep joints and muscles moving for overall better mobility. Try doing some gentle exercise such as a walk, gentle stretch, or a swim.  Swimming in particular is great for easing those sore and stiff muscles.

3. Get a massage

Massages are a great way to ease muscle tension by improving blood flow and mobility. We have fantastic massage therapists right here in Pottsville.

If you can’t afford a massage, try a foam roll.  Place the foam roller on the floor underneath the sore area and roll your body over it. You can buy foam rollers from exercise equipment stores, and check out online videos about how to use them.

4. Have a salt bath

Epsom salts are great for alleviating muscle pain and inflammation.  Try some Epsom salts in a warm bath with a bit of lavender oil to aid relaxation.

If you don’t like the thought of a bath, you can carefully apply a heat pack to relieve muscle soreness. But be careful to apply the heat pack for no longer than 10 minutes at a time.  There is a risk with heat packs of burning yourself if too hot, or with causing inflammation to muscles and joints, which could make the problem worse.

If the heat isn’t working, try a cold pack to reduce inflammation and nerve activity. Also only leave this on for 10 minutes at a time, and never put ice packs directly onto the skin.

5. Eat antioxidants

While it may seem easy to take an anti-inflammatory such as Panadol, there is emerging evidence that antioxidants may be more effective in relieving muscle soreness. For example, watermelon has an amino acid called L-citrulline, which can reduce muscle soreness.  Other foods to try include cherries, ginger and pineapple. Antioxidant supplements such as fish oil and curcumin (found in turmeric) may also help. Using topical arnica on the skin can also relieve muscle soreness.[1]

The best way to prevent muscle soreness is to stretch before exercise, and to work your way up to vigorous activity rather than jumping straight into it.  Also, ensure to keep well hydrated throughout exercise so that the muscles have more fluid during intense activities. It’s a good idea to have regular chiropractic, massage or acupuncture treatments to help keep your joints and muscles in peak condition.

However, if you experience ongoing muscle pain even without exercise, or pain that continues for more than a few days, see your health professional.

Chiropractors can help alleviate muscle pain that is associated with joint dysfunction and restrictions in the body. This allows muscles to move much more freely, and helps to reduce the risk of future injury.

For more information contact Bruce at Lane Chiropractic Pottsville on 6676 2270.


[1] https://www.healthline.com/health/fitness-exercise/sore-muscles#22.-Hydration,-proper-form,-and-mindful-practice-are-the-only-way-to-prevent-future-soreness

Ten tips to get a good night’s sleep

Sleep is just as important as a nutritious diet and exercise to maintain good health. A lack of sleep can lead to health issues such as a weakened immune system, mood problems like anxiety and depression, memory problems, high blood pressure, weight gain, and an increased risk of diabetes and heart disease.

However, getting a good night’s sleep is easier said than done in today’s busy world. In addition to work and home pressures, we are often bombarded with information from smart devices that can make it very hard for us to wind down at the end of the day. To help solve your sleeplessness issues, here are ten quick tips you can try for a good night’s sleep.

1. Get some sunlight

Your body naturally acts in accordance with its circadian rhythm, which is your natural internal alarm clock that lets your body know when to wake and sleep. Many of us spend too much time inside during the day, which impacts this rhythm. Try to get some natural sunlight each day, with sun protection, to help your natural body clock and improve your sleep.  If you can get yourself up early enough, try to watch the sunrise each day. Not only is it magical, but the sun’s first light helps to put you in a great mood and gives you energy for the day ahead. Getting up early to see the sunlight will also help you set up a pattern of going to bed a little earlier at night.

Blue lighting, which comes from our televisions, computers and smart devices, affects our circadian rhythm and keeps our bodies awake.  It also reduces hormones such as melatonin, which help us relax and get to sleep.

2. Reduce blue light exposure

Many new devices now have blue light filters that you can turn on when working on, or watching the screen. If your device doesn’t have an in-built blue light filter you can either wear glasses that block blue light, download apps that block blue light on your computer and smart devices, or avoid television, computers and smart devices such as mobile phones for two hours before bedtime.

3, Reduce your caffeine intake and avoid caffeine after 3pm

Caffeine can stay in our bodies and stimulate the nervous system for up to eight hours, making it difficult to sleep when caffeine is consumed late in the day.

Try to limit the amount of caffeine you have throughout the day, replacing it with water to hydrate your system, and avoid drinking caffeine after 3pm.

4. Try to maintain a sleep routine, and avoid lengthy daytime naps

Set yourself a sleep routine that includes consistent sleeping and waking hours each day, and a bedtime routine that helps prepare your body for sleep.

When you get into a regular sleeping and waking routine, it helps your body’s circadian rhythm and supports the production of the right levels of hormones, such as melatonin, that help you sleep.

As part of this routine try to avoid daytime naps wherever possible.  While short power naps can be beneficial, longer or irregular napping in the day can impact your circadian rhythm, which puts your body’s natural sleep clock out of time.

5. Avoid alcohol

Contrary to popular belief, alcohol doesn’t help you sleep and, in fact causes problems such as sleep apnea, snoring and disrupted sleep patterns. It also dehydrates the body, which impacts the ability to have a sound night’s sleep.

Replace alcohol with water – but not too much and not too late at night so you aren’t getting up to go to the toilet in the middle of the night.

6. Create a bedroom for sleep

Our sleep environment goes a long way to ensuring our comfort levels and a sound night’s sleep.  If your room is draughty or impacted by noise or light from outside, you won’t get a good night’s sleep.

Consider the temperature, smell, noise, light and furniture in your bedroom, including even the colours you use in your bedroom, and what will make the environment the most comfortable for you to get a good sleep.

Also invest in a comfortable and supportive bed, mattress and pillow that will help reduce your risk of joint and back pain.  Aim to achieve the most relaxing, quiet, clean and safe space you can get to optimise your sleep.

7. Avoid a big meal before bed

While your stomach may be rumbling and that midnight snack is tempting, aim to keep it light otherwise your body will be working hard to digest food, and this will make it difficult to get a deep sleep.

Conversely, avoid going to bed hungry otherwise your stomach may be getting you up during the night for a feed. Try to maintain a comfortable feeling in your stomach before going to bed. Sometimes a banana and glass of milk can do the trick.

8. Clear your mind

Stress is a big factor that impacts our ability to sleep. There’s not a lot you can do late at night to solve all the stressors in your life, so there is no point stressing about them when you need to sleep.  In fact, you’ll deal with stress and make better decisions after you get a good night’s sleep.

Try listening to calming music, or try meditation, a warm bath, reading a book, deep breathing or positive visualisation to help calm your mind before bed.  Your bedtime routine could incorporate some of these practices so that, over time, your body knows that any of these practices indicates it’s time to go to sleep.

9. Exercise regularly but not before bed

Exercise is a great way of burning up excess energy, reducing stress, and helping your body relax for a better night’s sleep. Exercise also releases those “feel good” hormones, endorphins, that help to reduce stress, depression and anxiety, which can impact sleep.

However, keep the exercise to daylight hours and avoid exercising before bed to reduce the risk of stimulating the nervous system and increasing hormones such as adrenaline that will keep you alert and awake.

10. Assume the sleep position

When sleeping, try to avoid sleeping on your stomach because it can cause neck problems, which then leads to pain and discomfort that in turn impacts sleep. 

Try to get in the habit of going to sleep on your side or on your back because this will reduce your risk of pain and discomfort, and will also provide a greater ability to breathe easier, and therefore sleep better.

If you still suffer from lack of sleep despite trying all of these methods, you may need to contact your health practitioner to confirm that you don’t have an underlying medical condition that is impacting your sleep. For example, sleep apnea causes sufferers to stop breathing during sleep, which severely impacts the quality of their sleep.

For more information about some natural approaches to helping you get to sleep contact Lane Chiropractic Pottsville on 6676 2270.

New World Health Organisation guidelines recommend 150 minutes of exercise each week

The World Health Organisation (WHO) is now recommending that adults have at least 150 minutes of exercise each week, and children average one hour of exercise each day.

The WHO guidelines outline the health risks of lack of exercise, and the need for adults and children to limit recreational screen time and get their bodies moving for both physical and mental wellbeing. Any physical activity is better than none, and more is better. Aerobic activity no longer needs to last 10 minutes or more to be beneficial but instead our health depends on us moving more as part of everyday life.

Current physical activity levels in Australia show that 85% of adults do not reach the recommended levels of physical activity and muscle strengthening exercise, while only one in five children meet the guidelines for physical activity of at least 60 minutes per day.

The WHO guidelines recommend:

  • Children aged 5-17 years should do at least an average of 60 minutes per day of moderate to vigorous aerobic physical activity. Activity that strengthens muscle and bone should be incorporated at least three days a week.
  • Adults aged 18-64 years should do at least 150-300 minutes of moderate aerobic physical activity, or at least 75-150 minutes of vigorous aerobic physical activity throughout the week. Adults should also do muscle strengthening activities on two or more days a week.
  • Adults 65 years and older should do at least 150–300 minutes of moderate aerobic physical activity, or at least 75–150 minutes of vigorous aerobic physical activity throughout the week. Mature adults should also do muscle strengthening activities at moderate or greater intensity on two or more days a week. As part of their weekly physical activity, mature adults should do varied multicomponent physical activity that emphasises functional balance and strength training on three or more days a week, to enhance functional capacity and prevent falls.
  • Pregnant and postpartum mothers once cleared by their doctor should undertake at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic physical activity throughout the week, and incorporate muscle strengthening and gentle stretching exercises.

For adults in particular, it’s important to keep moving to reduce the risk of joint and back pain from excessive time spent on the couch or at the computer.

To learn more about appropriate exercises for your body, and how to reduce your risk of joint and back pain, contact Lane Chiropractic Pottsville on 6676 2270.

Three ways to ease a tension headache without medication

With so much going on in the world right now, it’s not surprising that many people are coming to chiropractors with tension headaches.

A tension headache is a mild to moderate dull, aching pain in the head. It often feels like a tight band or pressure across your forehead, or on the sides or back of your head.  You may also experience scalp tenderness and a dull ache in your neck or shoulder muscles.

Tension headaches can be caused by various factors such as stress, dehydration, lack of sleep, and dietary imbalance. There are three key ways to ease a tension headache without medication.

  1. Try a cold compress

Pain is often caused by inflammation in tissues. A cold compress can help alleviate this pain. Try relaxing with a cold compress for 10 minutes on, and then 10 minutes off. If the cold compress doesn’t provide relief you can try a heat pack but ensure to drink plenty of water so that the heat pack doesn’t cause dehydration and make the headache worse.

  • Relaxation techniques

Try relaxing in a dimly lit room by lying down and focusing on deep breathing and progressive muscle relaxation. Make sure to drink water before the relaxation session in case the headache is the result of dehydration.

  • Allied health care

Allied health care such as chiropractic, massage and acupuncture can provide relief for tension headaches through gentle techniques that work with the needs of your body.

There are a number of things you can do to prevent tension headaches such as:

  • drink plenty of water each day to avoid dehydration
  • try to use relaxation techniques, even if it’s just deep breathing, as part of your daily routine to reduce muscle tightness
  • ensure to maintain a healthy, balanced diet with plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables
  • don’t smoke and limit your intake of alcohol, caffeine and sugar
  • try to get eight hours of sleep each night
  • exercise at least three times each week, even if it’s just a 20 minute walk.

For more information about how to reduce your risk and frequency of tension headaches contact Lane Chiropractic Pottsville on 6676 2270.

Three reasons to get a health check before starting a new exercise or sport

With spring already upon us, and summer just around the corner, it’s time to get our bodies beach ready, right?

But before starting a new exercise program, or re-starting exercise after the winter hiatus and COVID couch quarantine, there are three key reasons why it may be a good idea to consult your health care professional first.

1. Avoid injury

If you haven’t done exercise for a while, or are starting a new exercise program, you may increase your risk of muscular, joint or back injury. It’s advisable to get an assessment to determine any existing joint or muscular stiffness or weakness, so that your health care practitioner can advise you about steps to take so that you can avoid strain or injury when you exercise.

2. Identify the right exercise program that will deliver the best results for you

Sometimes we’d like to try a new sport or exercise, but it may not be the best fit for our body, particularly if you are susceptible to any musculoskeletal weakness. Your health care practitioner can look at your musculoskeletal system and your biomechanics to determine if the exercise or sport that you’d like to do puts you at greater risk of injury.  Then, they can either identify an alternative exercise program that may be better suited to your body type, or provide advice about measures that you can take to help reduce your risk of injury.

3. Check your heart health

With many of us confined during COVID quarantine measures, we have probably spent more time on the couch this winter than in previous years. Suddenly starting strenuous exercise could put strain on the heart and may result in cardiovascular issues. It’s a good idea to check your heart health, even with a quick visit to your GP, so that you maintain a healthy heart during exercise.

It’s much better to be safe than sorry when it comes to starting a new exercise program, so that you can avoid injury or too much strain on the body and be able to continue your exercise without the interruption of injury.

Lane Chiropractic in Pottsville is offering free 15 minute spinal and biomechanical health assessments during September. Get your free assessment before starting your new spring/summer exercise program to give your body the best chance of avoiding injury. To book your no obligation, free back and joint health check call 6676 2270.

Is your home office doing you harm?

Every week I see people with back and neck pain purely because they don’t have the right home office set up and are sitting still in one position for way too long.

When we are at a workplace, rather than home, we often tend to move around more to talk to colleagues, grab a cup of coffee, buy lunch, go to the printer etc. This activity tends to cease when working from home, and we can often forget to take those computer breaks that are critical to helping our minds and bodies reset.

To save you back, neck and joint pain – and reduce visits to your chiropractor, check out these simple tips on the attached Sunrise video for your home office set up.

There's been a big spike in back and neck aches as Aussies work from home during the COVID-19 pandemic.Here are some simple and cheap ways to prevent the pain.More on this story: https://7news.link/3ejMwtz

Posted by Sunrise on Tuesday, 26 May 2020

For more information and advice contact Lane Chiropractic Pottsville on 6676 2270

Why do our joints crack?

Do you ever wonder why your joints crack? There are a few simple reasons.

Our bodies tend to creak and groan at the best of times, especially as we age.  This is often due to a condition called crepitus, which describes any grinding, creaking, grating, cracking, popping or crunching that occurs when your joints move.  Sometimes the sounds your body makes can be loud enough for other people to hear.

Often, crepitus is painless and doesn’t mean anything is seriously wrong.  However, if it occurs with symptoms such as pain or trauma, there may be a more serious underlying medical condition so it’s wise to consult with your health practitioner.

Here are some of the common reasons why your body may get a little noisy especially around the neck, back and joints:

Articular pressure changes

Facet joints are where the back of adjacent vertebrae join together. Inside each facet joint is synovial fluid, which lubricates the joints.  Tiny gas bubbles can form and eventually collapse within synovial joints. As they are released, they can create a cracking, crunching or popping sound, which is harmless.

Ligament or tendon moving around bone

Ligaments and tendons both attach to bones. A ligament or tendon may make a snapping sound as it moves around a bone and/or over each other. This occurs because our muscles and tissues are too tight, or when they become less elastic as we age.

Bone-on-bone grinding

Facet joints degenerate due to osteoarthritis or disc generation, which results in less cushioning between the vertebrae. This can cause adjacent vertebral bones to rub against each other, causing a grinding noise or sensation.

Chiropractors can relieve the symptoms of crepitus. If you need any help alleviating creaks, cracks, pops and groans in your body contact Lane Chiropractic Pottsville on 6676 2270.

Article information courtesy of Veritas Health https://www.veritashealth.com/

Eight subtle signs your body needs help

We can all feel stiff, sore and tired from time to time but if the same pain keeps resurfacing, it may be your body trying to warn you that something is seriously wrong.

With our busy lives, it can be too easy to ignore the subtle signs that our bodies give us but by ignoring the warning signs you could be at risk of missing the early detection of a more serious issue.

There are eight common issues chiropractors see that, if left untreated, can lead to longer term issues that may require surgery or lifelong pain management.  Some of these issues may also signal potential life-threatening conditions:

Neck stiffness

While neck stiffness is quite common, particularly for people who spend long hours working on computers or using smartphones, it can also signal something more serious. Persistent neck stiffness may be the result of a degenerative cervical spine disorder which, if left untreated, can lead to permanent nerve damage, compression of the spinal cord, paralysis and in rare cases, death.

Joint pain

Joint pain is often considered a natural part of the aging process, and it can also emerge following strenuous exercise. However, persistent joint pain can severely limit your mobility and impact your overall health in the longer term. For example, limited mobility may lead to poor psychological health and obesity, which in turn can increase the risk of issues such as diabetes and heart disease.

Muscle weakness

We all get muscle weakness from time to time due to factors such as illness or an intense workout that causes muscle fatigue. However, ongoing weakness in the muscles can be a sign of issues such as nerve damage, muscular or skeletal degeneration, a herniated disc, neuromuscular disorder, or a tumour.

Numbness or tingling

While we can get numbness or tingling from sitting too long in a certain position, such as when your foot goes to sleep, having this symptom without cutting off blood circulation is an early warning sign of injury, nerve damage, a herniated disc, or even diabetes. If numbness or tingling related to nerve damage, injury or a herniated disc is left untreated, you may end up needing surgery.

Uneven posture

If you have uneven shoulders or hips, asymmetry of the back or your head rests off-centre you may have scoliosis, which is curvature of the spine. If left untreated, it can cause a reduced range of motion, pain, disc degeneration, and possibly cardiovascular and breathing problems caused by the rib cage constricting the heart and lungs.

Headaches

Headaches can be caused by factors such as stress, dehydration, low blood sugar, or misalignment of the neck or spine. Persistent headaches may be a sign of migraines, food allergies, nerve degeneration, or tumour.

Intermittent pain or stiffness

If you have pain or stiffness that comes and goes, it could be a sign of nerve damage, muscular or skeletal degeneration, or disc bulge.  Similar to other forms of pain, if it is left untreated intermittent pain or stiffness can become chronic pain, which then requires more intensive treatment and possibly surgery.

Sharp, Shooting Pain in Your Legs 

A sharp, shooting pain or tingling and weakness in your legs indicates a pinched nerve or slipped disc.  Without treatment, this can lead to longer term issues requiring long term pain medication or even surgery.

Chiropractors are trained to treat many of these conditions, or will refer you to another health specialist if they suspect a non-chiropractic issue. To find out more about the subtle warning signs your body gives you and how to treat them contact Lane Chiropractic Pottsville on 02 6676 2270.

Six signs you have an inflamed facet joint

Almost everyone gets back pain at one time or another, right? You lifted that heavy bin the wrong way, your worn-out workstation chair is a nightmare, you were rear-ended, you carry chronic tension in your shoulders, you tried to return an impossible tennis serve and threw out your back…the list goes on and on. But what if you have occasional periods of acute pain and there’s no apparent cause? This might be a signal that your facet joints are in trouble.

The facet joints are small, cartilage-lined points of contact where each individual backbone (vertebra) meets the one above and below it. They both enable your spine to flex during movement and also limit its range of motion. However, if the cartilage wears thin, pain can occur. Things like aging (wear and tear), obesity (extra weight creates a greater burden), a previous injury or trauma to the spine, and weight-bearing jobs are risk factors for facet joint damage.

If you have had no recent back strain or injury but you are starting to experience episodes of upper back pain, lower back pain, or pain that radiates outward from your spine, here are 6 clues that your facet joints may be the source of it:

  1. The pain occurs occasionally and unpredictably, perhaps scattered over several months.
  2. When the pain occurs, pressing on the skin in that area may cause soreness or tenderness; the muscles there tighten in response to pressure or movement (guarding reflex).
  3. It may not hurt to bend or lean forward, but doing it backward produces a definite “ouch!”
  4. If the pain is in the upper spine (between the base of the skull and the top of the ribcage), there may also be shooting or burning pain that radiates across the shoulders and upper back, but not down the arms or into the fingers.
  5. If the pain is in the lower back, facet joint compression can send nerve pain down into the buttocks and the back of the upper leg (pain that shoots down the front of the leg, or below the knee, is a symptom of another back problem called a herniated disc).
  6. Sitting for long periods aggravates the lower back pain episode, and riding in a car may be nearly intolerable.

Chiropractic care can help reduce facet joint inflammation. If you need help with facet joint pain contact Lane Chiropractic Pottsville on 6676 2270.

Article courtesy of Sperling Medical Group.